THANKS FOR TELLING ME

Someone has told you this because they want you to know and they think they can trust you – give a reassurance that it will stay confidential. You’ve been given some powerful information that may have been difficult to disclose - ‘thanks for telling me’ acknowledges that.      

 

HOW ARE YOU DOING? 

Asking a simple question like ‘how are you doing?’ gives someone the chance to tell you as much or as little as they want to. Don’t probe too much – just asking this is probably enough right now.    

 

IT’S OK…

It really is OK. HIV today, with early diagnosis and proper adherence to treatment, is a long term manageable health condition. It’s the stigma and negative attitudes that sometimes get in the way of people who are living with HIV getting on with their lives.    

 

WHAT CAN I DO?

Think about why someone has chosen to tell you – it may be that a bit of extra support or just someone to talk to is what’s needed. Ask what you can do and be led by what the person tells you they need. 

 

LET’S TALK ABOUT U=U

If you aren’t aware of the U=U message, you need to be. We now know that someone on HIV treatment and with an undetectable viral load can’t pass on HIV to someone else. Talk about it, not just to the person who’s disclosed to you, but to anyone else who’ll listen.      

 

NOTHING CHANGES 

For some people, fear of rejection after disclosing HIV status means never feeling able to tell anyone. Be reassuring that nothing is going to change just because someone’s told you that they’re living with a virus.    

 

ARE YOU ON TREATMENT?

Showing an interest in someone’s health can be supportive. If you don’t know anything about HIV treatments – make it your job to find something out. Educate yourself about HIV so that you have all the information you need. 

 

DRINKS ON FRIDAY?

Keep things normal. The person who told you wants to keep things normal too. If Friday night is drinks night there’s no reason why your plans should change – and every reason why they should stay the same.

Wednesday, 13 September, 2017

TOUGH MUDDER

TOUGH MUDDER

GHT Tough Mudder Team showed their strength for people living with HIV

 Tough Mudder

 

After 6 weeks of ‘training’, 5 amazing people took on 26 gruelling obstacles over a 12 mile course to raise much needed funds for George House Trust. The team of mudders included our regular giving manager Leroy and brave volunteers Liam, Stephen, Meg and Natasha.

 

 

The challenge took place on Sunday the 10th September at Cholmondeley Castle where the team had to face iced waters, overcome big heights, power through electric volts and of course fight their way through lots and lots of mud!

 

Liam, one of the participants said

"It was the hardest but most amazing experience of my life, I've hurt my ankle and every muscle in my body hurts but I would do it all again in a heartbeat if it made just a small bit of difference to somebody’s life."

Collectively the team have so far raised £2,483.00 from the generosity of friends, family and supporters but there’s still time to show your support and reward the team for all of their hard work by making a safe and secure donation on the participants pages - Leroy, Liam, Stephen, Megan and Natasha - via Just Giving.

 

Regular Giving manager Leroy said 

"Thank you to everybody who has supported so far and is making a positive difference to somebody’s life with HIV. The course was tough but there are people we support that are facing bigger battles and although I’m in pain, I’m happy that with your help we are all standing strong together and improving lives in our community here in Manchester."

Thank you to Tony Molloy at CorptelUK for his continued support to GHT, he sponsored the team to take part and made this muddy fundraiser possible.

Tuesday, 12 September, 2017

'HIV HAS CHANGED' CAMPAIGN

'HIV HAS CHANGED' CAMPAIGN

'HIV HAS CHANGED' CAMPAIGN

ViiV Healthcare are launching a public awareness campaign entitled ‘HIV has changed’ which intends to increase the public’s knowledge and understanding of HIV and to encourage people to test for HIV.

 

The campaign’s focal point will be a 10-foot living structure made up of a range of plants and flowers spelling out H-I-V that will be placed in New Cathedral Street in Manchester City Centre from 7-10 September.

 

The plant-based letters will be a physical representation of life and growth, and members of the public will be encouraged to interact with this living representation of HIV.

 

ViiV Healthcare hope that the message that ‘HIV has Changed’ will spread beyond the city centre as people passing by will be able to walk up to it, take pictures and share images on social media and other channels.

 

George House Trust, along with our PaSH partners LGBT Foundation and BHA for Equality, are supporting this campaign.

 

 

Friday, 1 September, 2017

WELLBEING PROJECT

LIVING IN MANCHESTER?  FEELING ISOLATED OR LACKING CONFIDENCE?

LIVING IN MANCHESTER?  FEELING ISOLATED OR LACKING CONFIDENCE?

 

Our Wellbeing Project, funded by Manchester City Council, aims to improve wellbeing, build confidence or help reduce social isolation for residents of Manchester who are living with HIV.

 

We can advise you about social groups or activities happening in your area.  It could be anything from improving your physical fitness, relaxation classes, crafts or outdoor activities – we can also help to fund it for you.

 

If you feel that you could benefit from this project email Naome Phiri or call her on 0161 274 4499.

 

Friday, 1 September, 2017

Living with HIV? Want to talk to us?
Call 0161 274 4499 or email: talk@ght.org.uk

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